Average Labour Cost/Price to Replace/Fit Kitchen Worktops/Surfaces





To clarify the following prices it is recommended that you read the article in the INFORMATION box below the PRICES…


(These prices are based on a tradesman’s rate of £150.00 per day and a labourer if required at £100.00 per day. This includes the cost of buying and collecting any materials, dumping any waste if necessary and any incidental materials they will need. The minimum price will usually be for a half day)



How Much Does it Cost To Replace a Kitchen Worktop?

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These prices are based on a tradesman’s rate of £150 per day and a labourer if required
at £100 per day. They include the cost of buying and collecting any materials, dumping any waste if necessary and any incidental materials they will need.
(The minimum price will usually be for a half day)


Job 1
To fit a new laminate covered work surface only, with no sink and just one edge strip to fix. One man will charge half a day’s labour, so lets say……..£125.00


Job 2
If he has to fit your old sink back into it, then he will charge for the day……..£180.00



Job 3
If you want three, new, mitred corner, solid wood work surfaces, with the old sink and hob re fitted and then two coats of oil……Call this one man two days………..£350.00

Worktops range from £70-£700 for a 3m length!


Legally with gas and electric hobs, a qualified person is required. This is covered in our
Hob Replacement article.

Granite, concrete and slate work surfaces are not available over the counter at the local “shed”. The company who makes them, fits them, so we can’t really give you labour charges. They are expensive of course!







For your must-see guide to Tradesmen's Rates please click on the map…

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A Price Guide and Information Sheet on Replacing Kitchen Worktops




information
There are a plethora (I’ve always wanted to use that daft word) of work surfaces to choose from. Gone are the days when all you could get was a selection of horrid, marble effect, melamine covered chipboard either 30 or 40 mm thick with a rounded edge. Now there’s some very nice solid wood, “granite”, slate and even concrete ones to choose from.

The granite ones aren’t hewn from a cliff face half way up Helvelyn by the way, they’re made from granite bits, set in resin. One advantage of granite and concrete if your surfaces “go round a corner” is that there will be no joints. They are factory made in moulds and fitted as one (monstrously heavy) piece. The solid wood surfaces aren’t a slice of a tree either, they’re composite. You wouldn’t want a tree slice anyway, it would turn from a flat surface into a propeller in about a week after your
central heating got to it unless it was 10mm (4”) thick .

If you decide on a wooden surface, make sure it is well sealed with at least 2 coats of Danish oil (or similar)
before you start using it. Depending on which “oil” you use, the first coat or coats, can be “thinned” with spirit, to ensure it gets right into the surface. The fitter should be able to recommend the most suitable type. Slate should be sealed as well but this very probably will be done in the factory.

If your units do go around corners, make sure the fitter is creating a mitred, glued joint. He uses a template and then cuts both pieces with a router, not a saw. He then removes three special shapes underneath and fits brackets to pull both lengths together, after first sealing the edge surfaces. I can’t imagine any fitter today using the old fashioned metal jointing strip but just make sure you haven’t engaged a jointing dinosaur.

Also if you are having laminate work surfaces fitted, it’s likely that separate strips (which should come with the new surface), will have to be glued to an exposed edge or two when it’s all finished. Make sure he is used to doing this, it’s not difficult to make a right pig’s ear of it.




A-Z of Job Pricing