Average Labour Cost/Price to Fit/Install an Extractor Hood/Chimney





To clarify the following prices it is recommended that you read the article in the INFORMATION box below the PRICES…


(These prices are based on a tradesman’s rate of £150.00 per day and a labourer if required at £100.00 per day. This includes the cost of buying and collecting any materials, dumping any waste if necessary and any incidental materials they will need. The minimum price will usually be for a half day)



How Much Does It Cost To Change an Extractor Hood?

extractor hood



These prices are based on a tradesman’s rate of £150 per day, a labourer if required at £100 per day and an electrician at £200 per day. They include the cost of buying and collecting any materials, dumping any waste if necessary and any
incidental materials they will need.

Read about the legalities of fitting electrics in kitchens at
electrics

(The minimum price will usually be for a half day)

I’ve just “googled” the price of hoods. A cheap cheerful conventional one cost £60.
Big old “island hoods” were going for over £2800. (my car’s not worth that much)!

Theses prices don’t include the hood.


Job 1
Fit a conventional hood, which doesn’t extract but just circulates. There’s even a handy power supply above a nearby wall cabinet.
A sparks will charge for half a day
………£120.00


Job 2
If there is no electrical supply, he will have to find cables in the room above, (so the carpet and boards will have to be disturbed), drop them down, fit a socket and have it plastered up.
This job will take 2 tradesmen a day plus their materials
………£380.00


Job 3
If the hood is to extract the fumes through the wall it’s fitted on, add…….£95.00


Job 4

To fit a boxed in duct at ceiling height, add………£190.00


Now give the decorators a ring!







For your must-see guide to Tradesmen's Rates please click on the map…

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Price Guide and Information Sheet on the Cost of Fitting an Extractor Hood/Chimney



information
They used to get squeezed in between wall cabinets once but lately they’re getting a bit above themselves and becoming right prima donnas! Especially, the ones above those monster ranges, that are apparently so vital to modern kitchen living.

I used to have one with a great swathe of flowing green tinted glass billowing out all around it. What a load of codswallop. There was a vertical tube disappearing up to the ceiling but all it ever did was recycle the smell of my bacon sandwich. It didn’t go anywhere, other than through a charcoal filter which was about as much use as a cardboard khazi..

So, if you’re getting one fitted, do it properly, get the smell of your “dauphinoise a la grec”
out of the house a bit sharpish and drive all the poor people crazy.

Obviously this isn’t always easy. You need an outside wall for a start and you don’t want to fit ducting if it makes you kitchen look like the inside of a church organ.




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