Average Labour Cost/Price to Dry Line/Plasterboard a Room





To clarify the following prices it is recommended that you read the article in the INFORMATION box below the PRICES…


(These prices are based on a tradesman’s rate of £150.00 per day and a labourer if required at £100.00 per day. This includes the cost of buying and collecting any materials, dumping any waste if necessary and any incidental materials they will need. The minimum price will usually be for a half day)



How Much Does it Cost To Dry Line/Plasterboard a Room?


dry lining


Job 1
Dry lining/Plasterboarding one (north facing) wall of a bedroom which has one window will require new skirting boards and foil-backed plasterboard, filled but not plastered. Decorating will need to be done afterwards. A radiator and electrical socket will need re-siting.

This will take two men three days to move the furniture, do the job, cut the carpet and replace everything.

Labour (inc. Plumber).............£850.00
Materials..................................£120.00


Total........................................£970.00


Job 2
The same job with bigger battens and 75mm insulation will add half a day’s work.

Labour.....................................£ 975.00
Materials..................................£ 120.00


Total........................................£1100.00


Job 3
If you want it plastered...........£1240.00







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A Price Guide and Information Sheet on Dry Lining/Plasterboard



information
This is a bit of a misnomer because lots of people want it plastered, in which case it becomes wet lining, of course. Either way, “dry lining/plasterboarding” suggests a retrospective process undertaken to either hide / improve the current situation, i.e. to hide damp, exposed brickwork or new internal insulation.

If yours is one of the first two jobs, it would be very sensible to include the plastering, anyway. You really can never have too much insulation.

Dry lining/plasterboarding is just fixing wood or metal “battens” to the wall and then fixing plasterboard to them. This is either filled or plastered, and then decorated. If you want insulation fitting, you can either fit thicker battens (let’s say 75mm as opposed to 25mm) with the same thickness of insulation slotted between them, or use insulation-backed plasterboard fixed to the 25mm thick battens.

That is relatively easy. The annoying bit is dealing with the reduction in room size and having to pay for new
skirtings, architraving and possibly ceiling cornice, extending the door frames and window reveals and re-siting the electrical sockets, light switches and radiators.

To complete the job, you need a vapour barrier. This keeps warm, moisture-laden air inside your room (its moisture content isn’t
tangible, it’s just a bit of science really). What you don’t want is for this moist air to pass through the plasterboard and condense on the insulation, battens or outside wall. This is called interstitial condensation (there’s some more science for you). Either foil-backed plasterboard or a big old sheet of polythene will do the trick. The jury is still out on which is best.

Ask your builder about interstitial condensation. Watch him stutter and start to whimper, he won’t have a clue what you’re on about, bless him!




A-Z of Job Pricing